Buying cocaine is “as popular as buying food or alcohol,” the judge says

Buying Cocaine Is “As Popular As Buying Food Or Alcohol,” The Judge Says

Buying cocaine has become as popular as buying food or alcohol, and due to the high appetite of users for this substance, the authorities are “impossible” to suppress drugs, a Sydney judge said.

Danny Watfa, 26, was sentenced to three years in prison on Thursday for taking part in running an Uber Eats-style delivery operation in Sydney.

In October 2020, he was arrested in Greenacre, southwest of the city during police arrest, and charged with continued drug trafficking and handling proceeds of crime.

After pleading guilty to the charges, Watfa faced a conviction Thursday in which Judge John Pickering, SC, said the network used a business model “remarkably similar to delivering food or alcohol”.

A Sydney Judge Says Authorities Will Try To Curb Cocaine Distribution As Buying Drugs Will Become As Popular As Buying Food Or Alcohol (Stock Image)

A Sydney Judge Says Authorities Will Try To Curb Cocaine Distribution As Buying Drugs Will Become As Popular As Buying Food Or Alcohol (Stock Image)

A Sydney judge says authorities will try to curb cocaine distribution as buying drugs will become as popular as buying food or alcohol (stock image)

Judge Pickering said Watfa had a significant impact on Sydney’s drug supply during his involvement in large-scale cocaine sales downtown.

“It reminds you of how many people in our society buy cocaine … it seems to be as popular as buying food or alcohol,” he said, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

Pickering said suppressing cocaine distribution would be “impossible” for the government, as demand for the substance remains high and drug sales are a serious accusation.

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The court heard that Watfa was involved in telephone negotiations for cocaine deals, often worth thousands of dollars, while ‘runners’ worked under him to deliver drugs.

Danny Watfa, 26, Faced A Court On Thursday Where He Was Convicted Of Involvement In An Uber Eats-Style Drug Delivery Operation.

Danny Watfa, 26, Faced A Court On Thursday Where He Was Convicted Of Involvement In An Uber Eats-Style Drug Delivery Operation.

Danny Watfa, 26, faced a court on Thursday where he was convicted of involvement in an Uber Eats-style drug delivery operation.

Judge John Pickering Said Cocaine Sales Remain A Serious Charge, But Would Be Difficult For Authorities To Control While Still Popular.

Judge John Pickering Said Cocaine Sales Remain A Serious Charge, But Would Be Difficult For Authorities To Control While Still Popular.

Judge John Pickering said cocaine sales remain a serious charge, but would be difficult for authorities to control while still popular.

While some runners already have less severe penalties, Judge Pickering said Watfe’s greater role in the operation justifies a higher penalty.

“Using the Uber Eats model, it’s not always easy to figure out where someone is sitting in a chain,” he said.

‘He [Watfa] he was on the phone, he was a negotiator, he negotiated with people higher than him. ‘

The court ruled that Watfa had addiction problems and needed stomach surgery and dental work, which contributed to his situation.

However, Judge Pickering found that he had a good chance of rehabilitation and that he would benefit from a longer parole, which gave him a parole period of one year and nine months.

As Watfa has already survived his arrest, he will be released on parole on 14 July.

In 2020, a report by the Australian Commission on Crime and Intelligence found Sydney to be the capital of cocaine in the country after sewage was tested for drug concentrations across the country.

Due to its high cost – with Australia among the countries with the highest price per gram – this country is a desirable import destination for drug distributors due to its profitable benefits.

However, demand for the product has had consequences, as Australian federal police said violence in Australian suburbs perpetrated by illicit motorcycle gangs and other unions is often linked to illicit drug trafficking.

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

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